This summer I started the great sport of fly fishing! In this article I would like to share some tips that I came up with along the way. 

  1. Don’t Buy Wading Boots! Especially if you are new to the sport. “Real” wading boots cost at least $200. The major difference between wading boots and a cheap pair of hiking boots is that waders don’t get heavy and water-logged. I just don’t think that it is worth the extra $150. I personally bought a $45 pair of hiking boots at Canadian Tire and I found them perfectly fine. 
  2. Don’t Focus on The Fish. In your first year, the most important thing to focus on is technique. You don’t need to have all of the technical cast but you should really work on the basic cast, and the roll cast. My goal for this summer was to make sure I could do both of those casts. When I went out I wouldn’t even think of the fish, I would just look at my line to make sure I was doing it properly. I ended up catching a couple of very small fish, but that was just a bonus. Next year my goal is to catch many more fish on the fly!
  3. Don’t be Afraid to Take Advice! The best person to get advice from is a friend or a relative, they will give you the best advice because they know you. If you don’t know anyone close to you who fly fishes, then the next best place to go is a local fly shop near where you plan on fishing. They will be able to tell you what fly to use, what time to go, and which parts of the river,or lake will produce the most fish. Not only will they tell you which fly to use, but they will also be able to sell that exact fly to you. It is a win/win situation. Also, social media gives great advice. For example, send a message to Wish4Fish on twitter and Ken will gladly answer your questions!
  4. Buy A Book! I personally bought the Orvis Guide to Fly Fishing by Tom Rosenbauer. This was an amazing book packed with information. Buy the book soon so that you can read it and get excited for spring! This definitely helped me with basically every aspect of fly fishing. It helped me figure out what equipment I needed, what line to choose, which knot to use, and what flies to cast. I highly recommend buying some reading material!
  5. Get on YouTube! There are so many great fly fishing channels for you to watch in preparation for your first fly fishing trip. My own personal favourites are: Wish4Fish, The New Flyfisher, Orvis, and occasionally Hushin puts out a fly fishing bideo. These are fun to watch, and very educational.
  6. Set Goals. According to many fly fishermen, fly fishing takes the same amount of effort to get good at, as golf. This means it takes practise, a lot of practise. To help break it down, I always had a goal in mind whenever I got the chance to go fly fishing this summer. Sometimes it was to improve my cast, my grip, or even get quicker at tying knots, or utting my waders on. Simple goals like that helped me imorove my technique, and my overall enjoyment of the sport.

I hope these tips will be useful tonyou, and good luck next season!

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